7:45am to 8:45am
Ten Shocking EKGs and Their Stories
Dr. Rich Kaplan

CONED: 1.0 Clinical Patient Care KEYWORD: MEDICAL

I will review ten cases with their corresponding EKGs. We will then discuss the prehospital and emergency departmentt treatment of each of the patients. This session is appropriate for all EMS levels with an emphasis on ALS treatments.

Why They Stay: Building an Agency Culture that Promotes Retention
Dan Batsie

CONED: 1.0 Clinical Patient Care KEYWORD: OPERATIONS

Recruitment and retention failures are an epidemic that plagues EMS at all levels. While pay plays a large role, the factors that are most controllable by leadership are consistently related to the culture that is created within the organization. Pride, identity, ownership, and belonging are among the most important anchors for retention and yet these valuable traits are too often minimized and ignored. Retention is a leadership skill that can be crafted and improved and we discuss how to do just that. This session is appropriate for all EMS levels.

Thirty Days to Live
David Lacovey

CONED: 1.0 Clinical Patient Care KEYWORD: PEDS/OB

Medical emergencies during the first month of life can present challenges to the prehospital care provider.  Utilizing case studies, we will review and discuss the appropriate assessment, recognition, and field management of some common medical emergencies seen during the first thirty days of life. This session is appropriate for all EMS levels.

Trends You Need to Know:  What is New with the AHA and EMS
Gina Hrach

CONED: 1.0 Other KEYWORD: OPERATIONS

We describe the system of care, the importance of the newest research, program development and up-to-date guidelines associated with disease states such as STEMI, NSTEMI, stroke and out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.  The American Heart Association's Mission: Lifeline® program enhancements will be reviewed to support the known strategy of collaboration to impact patient outcomes.  Resuscitation Quality Improvement (RQI) will be introduced to share the most innovative program for CPR recertification. This session is appropriate for all EMS levels.

Blood, Guts and Gore
Dr. Richard Wadas

CONED: 1.0 Clinical Patient Care KEYWORD: TRAUMA

Research has demonstrated that controlling bleeding as soon as possible after trauma saves lives. The Stop the Bleed program has been shown to be very successful; classes are being taught everywhere to everyone. AS EMS providers, you sometimes see things that are a bit more ... complicated. We'll review hemorrhage control and the use of tourniquets with an emphasis on impaled objects and amputations. These are not just flesh wounds! This session is appropriate for all EMS levels.


9:00am to 10:30am
Critical Incident Survivor
Dr. L. Michael Peterson

CONED: 1.0 Clinical Patient Care KEYWORD: TRAUMA

In this powerful presentation, you will hear first hand how Dr. Mike Peterson, as a patrol officer, actually had two events in which EMS saved his life. The first occurred during a foot chase in which he was stabbed twice. The second as a motorcycle patrol officer who was run over by a fully loaded tractor trailer and suffered a crushed chest and near amputation of his arm. Stemming his chest bleeding by stuffing his injured hand in his open chest, Peterson stayed alive until paramedics arrived and saved his life. Faced with injuries that prevented him from returning to his police motorcycle position, during his rehab, he was pointed toward medical school. He now serves as an EMS physician, medical director and flight program medical director. His inspirational story will show you how you can survive the worst of what life throws at you to be a leader in EMS. This session is appropriate for all EMS levels.


11:00am to 12:00pm
Rapid Triage and Extrication of Patients in a Hostile Environment
Robert Druga

CONED: 1.0 Clinical Patient Care KEYWORD: TRAUMA

Unfortunately, active shooter or threat incidents have, are, and will occur on a regular basis.  Based on the typical injuries that occur during these incidents, time needed to triage and extricate should not be wasted.  This class reviews SMART Triage and how it can be used quickly and more effectively.  It will also show how extrication of victims can be done more efficiently, with little resources and less physical stress.  This session is appropriate for all EMS levels.

Boots on the Ground: Peers Helping Peers
Dr. Sheila Roth

CONED: 1.0 Clinical Patient Care KEYWORD: OPERATIONS

Have you ever wondered how to talk to a co-worker who seems to be having a bad day, a bad week, or going through a bad life event? We teach you what to say when times get tough. The skills of helping a co-worker through a difficult time are not so different from responding to an EMS call.   This session is appropriate for all EMS levels.

Trauma in Children
David LaCovey

CONED: 1.0 Other KEYWORD: PEDS/OB

To prepare the EMS provider with skills and knowledge to improve their recognition and treatment of the pediatric trauma patient.  Pediatric patient case reviews will be used to emphasize prehospital care experiences that resulted in positive and negative outcomes. This session is appropriate for all EMS levels.

Why the Closest Trauma Center Matters - Achieving Zero Preventable Deaths
Mike Taramelli

CONED: 1.0 Clinical Patient Care KEYWORD: TRAUMA

In order to achieve zero preventable deaths, we must control life-threatening hemorrhage as quickly as possible.  Efforts such as widespread utilization of tourniquets and Stop the Bleed education help, however, further focus needs to be made to ensure the severely injured trauma patient does not die from a preventable death.  Putting the emphasis back on external hemorrhage control, ABC's and rapid transfer to the nearest trauma center can help achieve zero preventable deaths. This session is appropriate for all EMS levels.

I think I'm Going to Throw Up: Prehospital Management of the Nausea and Vomiting Patient
Dan Batsie

CONED: 1.0 Clinical Patient Care KEYWORD: MEDICAL

"I think I'm going to throw up" is a complaint heard daily. It's so common that most providers have developed a reflex to quickly grab for the emesis bag and pray they don't have to clean up a mess. At the advanced levels, the reflex has evolved into dispensing antiemetic medications like candy at Halloween. Not all nausea and vomiting patients are routine and frequently these symptoms mask underlying, life-threatening problems. We discuss the most common etiologies of nausea and vomiting and provide assessment strategies to better identify when these symptoms indicate a potentially critical patient. We will describe best practice, prehospital treatment for nausea (both basic and advanced interventions) and review the current evidence to differentiate myth from fact. This session is appropriate for all EMS levels.


12:45pm to 1:45pm
I Got a Fever...And the Only Prescription is More Cowbell!
Dr. Chuck Feronti

CONED: 1.0 Other KEYWORD: MEDICAL

Using a case based approach, we'll discuss the topic of fever.  Infectious and non-infectious causes will be addressed. Appropriate protection for personnel will be discussed when needed, and we'll dive into the workup/management of these various febrile illnesses. This session is appropriate for all EMS levels.

Narcan or Narcan't: Controversies in Overdose Management
Dr. Jason Kodat

CONED: 1.0 Clinical Patient Care KEYWORD: MEDICAL

Is Naloxone a miracle medication or demon drug? As with everything else, the truth lies somewhere in between, but the devil is in the details. With this session, get a refresher on Naloxone's pharmacology and what its potential best use might be. An added bonus is an analysis of more than seventy events in which first responders were given naloxone--is there really a danger of incidental exposure? This session is appropriate for all EMS levels.

EMSVO - Safe Backing Practice for EMS
Richard Kaufman

CONED: 1.0 EMSVO KEYWORD: EMSVO

This course focuses on understanding the importance of safe vehicle backing measures and adopting these best practices into your organization's driving procedures. This session is appropriate for all EMS levels.


2:00pm to 3:00pm
What Saves Lives During Active Shooter Events?
Dr. Ronald Roth

CONED: 1.0 Clinical Patient Care KEYWORD: TRAUMA

On 10/27/2018 a single gunman entered the Tree of Life Synagogue in Pittsburgh. In the aftermath, after action reports identified several factors that saved lives during the tragedy. Sharing these findings has the potential to save lives should tragedy strike in other locations. This session is appropriate for all EMS levels.

They're Not Just Little Adults: Challenges in Assessing the Pediatric Patient
Dr. Sylvia Owusu-Ansah

CONED: 1.0 Clinical Patient Care KEYWORD: PEDS/OB

This is a comprehensive and interactive overview of the pediatric assessment triangle (PAT) with a case based approach. The PAT is an evidence based tool that can be used in 30 - 60 seconds to quickly determine the acuity of a child and can determine whether a child is in respiratory distress and/or failure, has altered mental status, or shock. This helps to give you a rapid and visual tool to assess the severity of pediatric illness. This session is appropriate for all EMS levels.

Chest and Abdominal Injuries - Are They Related?
Dr. Leonard Weiss

CONED: 1.0 Clinical Patient Care KEYWORD: TRAUMA

Except for the brain, all vital organs live in the chest and abdomen. Therefore, injuries to these areas have a high mortality rate and should be taken seriously. We discuss signs and symptoms of multiple organ involvement. Medical terminology, and current prehospital treatment for these types of injuries. This session is appropriate for all EMS levels.

Some Get It Right, Some Get It Wrong: Interacting With the Media
Dr. Christian Martin-Gill

CONED: 1.0 Clinical Patient Care KEYWORD: OPERATIONS

Recurring threats, mass gatherings, and daily EMS events require everyone to be ready to speak to the media and the public. Are you ready to respond if someone puts a microphone in front of you? How should you interact on social media within your EMS agency? We review risk communications for everything from weather events, mass shootings, and daily EMS operations. We explore actual incidents where it was done right or very wrong when interacting with the media and the public. This session is appropriate for all EMS levels.

Save the Brain - Preventing Secondary Injuries
Dr. Vince Mosesso

CONED: 1.0 Clinical Patient Care KEYWORD: MEDICAL

TBI's account for 25% of trauma fatalities. However, prehospital management is not widely understood (do we bag them up or do we bag them down)? From bleeds to herniation, EMS can make a difference in outcome. Let's break it down together. This session is appropriate for all EMS levels.


3:15pm to 4:15pm
Adult Trauma Assessment - A Systematic Approach to Patient Evaluation
Dr. Walt Stoy

CONED: 1.0 Clinical Patient Care KEYWORD: TRAUMA

Walt will share information and demonstrate with the assistance of participants of how to think about evaluation of adult trauma patients. From scene size up, primary assessment, secondary assessment and on-going assessment of patients presenting with traumatic injuries, this session shall speak to matters that affect every provider presented with these types of patient scenarios. This gathering is an opportunity to review situations and gain knowledge and skills on how to approach future adult patient who present with trauma. No power point, just talking, showing and sharing about patients that need to be assessed. This session is appropriate for all EMS levels.

Fentanyl Facts and Fiction: A Safety Guide for First Responders
Simon Taxel

CONED: 1.0 Clinical Patient Care KEYWORD: MEDICAL

There have been a multitude of reports suggesting that public safety responders have suffered toxic exposure to illicit fentanyl simply by being in close proximity to it.  However, the American College of Medical Toxicology and the American Academy of Clinical Toxicology both agree that there is little to no risk of occupational exposure to fentanyl and its analogs for first responders. They state unequivocally that the transdermal absorption and or aerosolization and subsequent inhalation of fentanyl are not possible. To date, none of the reported overdoses related to incidental exposure to fentanyl by first responders have been validated with toxicological evidence. We describe the history of fentanyl, discuss the perceived and actual hazards that are present when the drug is found at the scene of emergency incidents, and provide evidence-based guidance for first responders to safely operate at those scenes.   This session is appropriate for all EMS levels.

Five Causes of Sudden Death and What You Can Do About Them
Dr. Chadd Nesbit

CONED: 1.0 Other KEYWORD: MEDICAL

Pre-hospital providers often encounter patients in cardiac arrest or near arrest states that then progress to arrest.  Sometimes the cause may be obvious, while, in other cases, the patients are reported to be healthy prior to the incident.  We discuss five medical causes of sudden death and talk about clues the provider should look for, and, most importantly, what actions you should take to care for the patient.  We will discuss diagnosis and treatment in these situations for both ALS and BLS providers.   This session is appropriate for all EMS levels.

Latest Advances in Acute Endovascular Stroke Therapy 2020
Dr. Andrew Ku

CONED: 1.0 Clinical Patient Care KEYWORD: MEDICAL

Acute stroke therapy has evolved greatly in the last ten years and is one of the areas where great advances are still being made. We will cover the latest treatments available both locally and internationally. Focus will be made on new studies and technologies and techniques in treatment of both acute ischemic stroke and acute hemorrhagic stroke. We will review some of the tools available to aid in decision making and evaluation of patients with stroke. This session is appropriate for all EMS levels.

Make it, Check it, Keep it: Effective Airway Management
Dr. Christian Martin-Gill

CONED: 1.0 Clinical Patient Care KEYWORD: MEDICAL

Airway management is one of the most challenging aspects of prehospital care. New devices including video laryngoscopy, new supraglottic airways, and more common use of bougies have changed the traditional mode of intubation. Yet basic airway techniques and knowledge of anatomy can have the greatest impact in preventing hypoxia. This session will describe the most important habits of highly effective airway management and include videos of real airways being managed. This session is appropriate for all EMS levels.


4:30pm to 5:30pm
Getting Blamed for Treating Pain
Dr. Ronald Roth

CONED: 1.0 Clinical Patient Care KEYWORD: MEDICAL

Are EMS providers creating the next opioid crisis by administering narcotic pain medications in the field? Will the tradition of EMS providers poorly treating painful conditions continue with the new medications added to the PA EMS drug list (Ketorolac, Ketamine, Acetaminophen?) Are these newly added medications really safe for all patients? Please attend so you can become a more informed pain reliever. This session is appropriate for all EMS levels.

Medical Devices and Implants for Emergency Providers
Dr. Nichols von Foerster

CONED: 1.0 Clinical Patient Care KEYWORD: MEDICAL

We discuss the most common devices encountered in prehospital settings, specifically pacemakers, AICD's (automatic implanted cardioverter-defibrillators), vagal nerve stimulators, and insulin pumps. You will gain a basic understanding of their function, associated physiology, and implications for emergency care. We discuss the indications for the various devices, the patient physiology you can expect if someone has the device, basic device components, common malfunctions, and how to approach field and emergency assessment and management of both the patient and device. This sesson is appropriate for all EMS levels.

Essentials of Tactical EMS: SWAT for the EMS Provider
Dr. Leonard Weiss

CONED: 1.0 Clinical Patient Care KEYWORD: OPERATIONS

In this segment, we discuss the basic need to know for tactical EMS as well as the latest evolutions. While this discussion will include important aspects for TEMS providers, in today's era, everyone in public safety must now be engaged in this critical system of care. This session is appropriate for all EMS levels.

Initial Burn Management in The Field
Jennifer Robison

CONED: 1.0 Clinical Patient Care KEYWORD: MEDICAL

This session focuses on both BLS and ALS provider management of burns in the field. It goes over the functions of the skin, classification of burns by age and type, and recent data on burns. You learn how to rapidly assess, treat and transport burn patients as well as provide rapid fluid resuscitation and burn center referral criteria. This session is appropriate for all EMS levels.

EKGs for the BLS Provider
William Miller

CONED: 1.0 Clinical Patient Care KEYWORD: MEDICAL

Interpretation of EKGs lives in the land of the Paramedic, PHRN, PHPE, and above.  However, nothing says that if you are a BLS provider that you can't assist your advanced level partners with getting the electrodes on the patient, or alerting them to a possible problem when the EKG suddenly changes in appearance or "just doesn't look right," and even capture a baseline 12 lead before the "response unit" meets up with you.  This presentation will review basic cardiac anatomy and physiology, explain how heart activity translates into the squiggly lines we call an EKG, and includes some hands-on demonstration work to insure you know how to get the leads on your patients correctly. This session is appropriate for all EMS levels.